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Corner Office: We Take 5 With SDAF’s Managing Director, Lauren Cook

Lauren at Point Loma Nazarene University’s Science Center. Photo by Tomoko H. Matsubayashi, connect with her at tomografica.com In a profession as collaborative as design, it is crucial to raise awareness, give back, and get involved with the nonprofit organizations dedicated to making positive change. Enter Lauren Cook, Managing Director …

Lauren at Point Loma Nazarene University’s Science Center. Photo by Tomoko H. Matsubayashi, connect with her at tomografica.com

In a profession as collaborative as design, it is crucial to raise awareness, give back, and get involved with the nonprofit organizations dedicated to making positive change. Enter Lauren Cook, Managing Director of the San Diego Architecture Foundation (SDAF).

“Community is what makes us so special,” says Cook, who lives in South Bay.

With 28 years of experience in the non-profit sector, Cook dedicates her time, knowledge, and resources to supporting the SDAF community, which relies on the tireless efforts of hundreds of volunteers to orchestrate a calendar buzzing with events.

Raised in Jamaica, the daughter of missionaries, Cook is passionate about increasing awareness and diversity, intersectionality, and inclusion through open dialogues to inspire the next generation of change agents. Or at the very leastadmirers of design. Cook was reared on helping others: she is the Executive Director of Survivors of Suicide Loss San Diego and worked previously in development for PROMISES2KIDS. She brings dynamic experience in the built environment space, having worked alongside the Southern California Rental Housing Association, the San Diego Green Building Council, Citizens Coordinate for Century 3 (C-3), and Uplift San Diego.

“Membership is really about inclusivity,” she says. “Our events reflect every nuance of design and give everyone a part in creation. Architects visualize a structure and then builders bring it to life. Landscape architects harmonize it with the environment and interior designers/artists continue the flow with paint, textiles, art, lighting, sound and much more. We are a community organization because that is what design is. Communal creation.

Lauren at Point Loma Nazarene University’s Prescott Prayer Chapel. Photo by Tomoko H. Matsubayashi, connect with her at tomografica.com

Here, we sit down with Cook on OH! San Diego 2022, the World Design Capital designation, her newfound sketching prowess, and why Point Loma Nazarene University is a must-see for any architecture lover.  

WDC 2024 is a huge deal. Why? It’s a fascinating partnership with Tijuana. I was pretty honored to be one of the people from an organization who was asked to be in the room when the consortium pitched our region to the WDC delegate, who had just come in from Russia. After AIA, SDAF had the most tenure with almost 45 years in existence. The designation allows us to be a recognized globally as a leader in transborder design. Throughout 2024, an international spotlight will fundamentally strengthen design values across our region, raising awareness and collaboration. The WDC amplifies existing initiatives and strengthens alliances across policy, social change, culture, and infrastructure.

Save the Date  OH! San Diego is such an incredible program and again – is part of worldwide series of these community events. This year on March 18th-20 we are doing a “collection” of neighborhoods featuring different communities in the region. They are diverse, special and offer a unique flair. We’re also leaning into a sub theme of transit to explore our public access in San Diego. Think walking tours, bike tours, trolleyaccessible neighborhoods. It’s all about connectivity.

The perks of membership? They are numerous. For one, SDAF’s general membership is free, which is not typical. The board voted last year to remove any barrier to the San Diego design community. We want families, young people, old people, ANY people, to have access to architecture and design. We also have a VIP membership that allows members to support us while accessing some dynamic programs which are designed with them in mind. Every month, we provide something for community members to participate in.

BEEP’s KidSketch? It’s a new way of seeing. Learning how to sketch has forced me to slow down and really look at structures. And each one has an amazing backstory! I haven’t missed a sketch since September of 2020. And I now have three sketches on my phone that I will promptly show you if you ask. It’s one of SDAF’s rockstar programs, and we recently secured a county grant to ensure its foothold for generations to come.

You graduated from Point Loma Nazarene University. Tell us about the award-winning architecture scene here. The property has a long history and was originally a theosophical society. They have created some incredible buildings, most notably the spectacular Greek Amphitheater. Recently Carrier Johnson + CULTURE designed two buildings (shown): the Prescott Prayer Chapel and the Science Center. The chapel is lovely and has this stirring effect when you enter. I love the science building because such care has been taken to make it fit with the land and space. Firsttime visitors here always say “I had no idea this was all here!

Finish this sentence. Design is… For everyone.

Lauren & Gillian at Point Loma Nazarene University’s Science Center. Photo by Tomoko H. Matsubayashi, connect with her at tomografica.com

Interview & write up by Gillian Flynn, connect with her at https://gillianvflynn.com/

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Lasting legacies – mourning the loss of two wonderful Architects

Our condolences to the families, friends, and colleagues of the two great Architects we lost this week. Locally, founder of SILLMAN (Architects), Larry Sillman passed away at the age of 76. I personally had the opportunity to collaborate with Larry and his team on a couple of projects and found …

Our condolences to the families, friends, and colleagues of the two great Architects we lost this week.


Locally, founder of SILLMAN (Architects), Larry Sillman passed away at the age of 76. I personally had the opportunity to collaborate with Larry and his team on a couple of projects and found Larry to be a kind, always upbeat & positive influence on those around him. He cared deeply about the people around him, culminating in SILLMAN being named PSMJ Resource Inc’s #1 Employer of Choice in 2021. That was the type of leader & mentor Larry was. You can read about Larry’s career in this SD News article about his retirement just months ago.

SILLMAN made this announcement on their Instagram account:

“It is with a heavy heart that we announce the passing of our dear friend and founding principal Larry Sillman.
Larry was a beloved member of the San Diego community and active player in shaping the Architectural landscape we call home. We can say, without a doubt, that his time with us left a lasting, positive impact that will continue to live on well beyond his years.
Thank you Larry for always offering a helping hand with kindness, patience, and insightful understanding.
We’ll miss you.”

Also this week we lost one of the international giants of modern, tech-influenced architecture & Pritzker Price awardee – Sir Richard Rogers. He was best known for designing the Pompidou Center in Paris (in partnership with Renzo Piano) and the Lloyd’s Building in London, but Rogers influence stretched all around the world. Trying to write about the influence Rogers has had on so many architects is simply overwhelming – I mean, the words ‘industry giant’ don’t even seem to cut it when thinking about his work. He’s been an active example of the power of design, the belief in sustainability & technologies and an advocate for regionalistic architecture for longer than I’ve been alive.  I’ll simple encourage you to read more about Rogers in this New York Times article.

Our built environment is better for both of their contributions, and we thank them for it.

Pauly

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SDAF’s Legacy Film Series – Maxine Ward, AIA

Continuing our Legacy Film Series this week we celebrate one of SDAF’s all-time legends, Maxine Ward. It’s been 16 years since Maxine joined the San Diego Architectural Foundation and 2021 has been her final year on our board. Her list of accomplishments for SDAF is mind-blowing, check this out… Along …

Continuing our Legacy Film Series this week we celebrate one of SDAF’s all-time legends, Maxine Ward.

It’s been 16 years since Maxine joined the San Diego Architectural Foundation and 2021 has been her final year on our board. Her list of accomplishments for SDAF is mind-blowing, check this out…

Along with David McCullough, Maxine led the effort to reinvent & relaunch the Orchids & Onions Awards in 2006, paving the way for the fun & energetic program that is today.

From 2010-2011 Maxine was SDAF’s Vice President, supporting Larry Hoeksema who was President at the time. In 2012 Maxine stepped up to the role of President and guided SDAF through it’s most challenging financial times. Keeping the foundations doors open was the priority and can be attributed to Maxine’s leadership for the three years (2012, 2013 & 2014) we were fortunate to have her as our President. Being her VP during these years gave me a personal insight into her passion for SDAF and her no-nonsense, dedicated leadership style.

As if that wasn’t enough, in 2015 Maxine led a new committee to launch OH! San Diego as part of the internationally successful Open House community. As only the second city in the United States at the time to join in the Open House effort, it was a giant commitment to showcasing San Diego’s built environment as a free program to the public. A team of volunteers set up around town and property owners generously shared their spaces. It was an enormous success, a program that we proudly curate annually since, and it was all due to Maxine’s dedication & leadership.

Honestly I could go on for days about how much I appreciate & respect Maxine, so I’ll just leave it with the fact that I am thrilled to celebrate Max for ALL of her contributions to San Diego’s built environment. And to formally acknowledge her efforts, we are awarding her this ORCHID for finally recognizing that 16 years is one heck of a run. Love you Max.

Pauly 

P.S. check out this great post from AIA San Diego on Maxine from when she was recognized with AIA San Diego’s 2015 Young Architect of the Year Award.

or watch the video here on SDAF’s YouTube channel  

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Coming on Strong: Urban Designers Gather for Strong Town event and Ponder “Stroads”

  “If you need a sign to tell people to slow down, you’ve designed your street wrong,” said Charles Marohn to an intimate crowd on November 18th at the San Diego History Center. On this night, SDAF sponsored a ULI (Urban Land Institute) speaking engagement and book signing with Charles …

 

“If you need a sign to tell people to slow down, you’ve designed your street wrong,” said Charles Marohn to an intimate crowd on November 18th at the San Diego History Center.

On this night, SDAF sponsored a ULI (Urban Land Institute) speaking engagement and book signing with Charles Marohn, founder, president and podcaster of Strong Towns, a grassroots organization that supports a drastically different model of development for America’s cities, towns, and neighborhoods.

Marohn was on tour with his current book, “Confessions of a Recovering Engineer: Transportation for a Strong Town.” As someone who reexamines transportation infrastructure—and its values and assumptions—for a living, it seemed fitting that he commandeered the ever-widening Interstate 5 to reach his final destination at Balboa Park.

Having spent two decades analyzing urban growth patterns as a land use planner and Professional Engineer (PE) licensed in the State of Minnesota, Marohn believes the post-World War II approach to town and city planning has led to debt problems, wasteful infrastructure investments and seemingly incurable congestion.

As a country, the US is good at construction and building things like “stroads,” he said, which creates an illusion of wealth. Cities favor mega-watt, large-scale finished projects over more organic, incremental growth. Changes as small as road width, for example, can make cities more vibrant.

“A stroad is a street/road hybrid. I have often called it the ‘futon of transportation alternatives’. Where a futon is an uncomfortable couch that also serves as an uncomfortable bed, a stroad is an auto corridor that does not move cars efficiently while simultaneously providing little in the way of value.”


So, what makes a strong town? Towns must prioritize human mobility to solve congestion. Walkable cities lead directly to growth, Marohn said. Building downtowns and neighborhoods with complex street design can make a local economy thrive. To the landscape architect’s delight—not just any design will do.

“A sidewalk or a path does not make a place walkable. A comfortable and safe walking experience does,” he said.

Marohn has built a vibrant online community around his new vision of urban development that breaks with modern practices. He authored “Thoughts on Building Strong Towns” — Volume 1 and Volume 2 — as well as “A World Class Transportation
System.”

In synopsis – a Strong Towns approach:

  • Relies on small, incremental investments instead of large, transformative projects
  • Emphasizes resiliency of result over efficiency of execution
  • Is designed to adapt to feedback
  • Is inspired by bottom-up action and not top-down systems
  • Seeks to conduct as much of life as possible at a personal scale
  • Is obsessive about accounting for its revenues, expenses, assets and long-term
    liabilities
  • Understands why the conventional approach to solving chronic transportation
    problems—as well as the latest fads—are actually making things worse
Write up by Gillian Flynn, connect with her at https://gillianvflynn.com/

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Beyond the Buildings: Dennis O’Connor and his Acre of Awesome

    Acre of Awesome might be one of the most sustainably driven venues to host Pecha Kucha Night in San Diego. Ever. When the pandemic hit, Dennis O’Connor, co-founder of Thorn Brewing, had already planned to “re-craft” overstocked beer into a new line of spirits. He anticipated an average …

 
 
Acre of Awesome might be one of the most sustainably driven venues to host Pecha Kucha Night in San Diego. Ever. When the pandemic hit, Dennis O’Connor, co-founder of Thorn Brewing, had already planned to “re-craft” overstocked beer into a new line of spirits. He anticipated an average of 2-4 trucks a month to dabble and experiment. Instead, he was facing down 4-6 trucks a week of unused, about-to-expire beer. And so, the revolutionary ReBru Spirits was born.
 
“I unrolled my camping mat and I was sleeping at the distillery,” says the North Park native and CEO of San Diego Taxman. “The pandemic absolutely accelerated our plan.”
 
The Barrio Logan compound became an R&D lab for sustainability and indoor-outdoor food and beverage concepts. The team worked 24-7 to conjure craft gin, vodka, and limited-edition whiskey from unsold craft beer. To date, the distillery has processed over 400,000 gallons of repurposed beer—or 3.2 million pints—destined for landfills. Their efforts have lessened the burden on municipal wastewater treatment facilities and mitigated the impact on local ecosystems. And they’ve wooed judges along the way: their refined small-batch vodka and gin has won eleven awards in four competitions.
 
Meanwhile, as local restaurants were racing to create more outdoor dining space, O’Connor was repurposing more than beer alone. He was buying furniture and equipment at a clip from local restaurant auctions.
 
“We never could have planned for this layout,” says O’Connor of the historic Fraser’s Boiler Service building that houses the ventures. “The design almost created itself.”
 
Acre of Awesome combines several different establishments in one: there’s Thorn’s 30-barrel brewhouse and tasting room, featuring signature and seasonal brews like Coconut Porter, Guava IPA, and Hard Ginger Beer. Add to the list Kové Hard Yerba Mate: a new twist on a classic South American beverage, it is available on tap and in to-go four packs.
 
Here on National Avenue, sustainability is no mere buzz word. It’s the main ingredient. On any given night, the outdoor pizza restaurant churns out wood-fired pies utilizing spent grains in the crust. And the barbeque establishment—serving pulled pork, brisket, smoked turkey, and ribs—provides the charcoal and charred oak to filter and flavor the spirits.
 
“It was a pure passion project,” says O’Connor. “It wouldn’t have become such a dynamic space so quickly if it wasn’t for COVID allowing us to work on the business instead of in it.”

Interview & write up by Gillian Flynn, connect with her at https://gillianvflynn.com/

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SDAF’s Legacy Film Series – Alison Whitelaw, FAIA

Earlier this year I set a goal to expand SDAF’s legacy through a film series celebrating several directors, both past and present, who have contributed 10+ years with the foundation. Inspired by commemorative films on Bob Mosher and Graham Downes, I thought “why wait until we have lost these wonderful …

Earlier this year I set a goal to expand SDAF’s legacy through a film series celebrating several directors, both past and present, who have contributed 10+ years with the foundation. Inspired by commemorative films on Bob Mosher and Graham Downes, I thought “why wait until we have lost these wonderful people, let’s celebrate them now!”  

And so, with the support of current Directors Michelle Harrison McAllister and Mike Thorpe who offered to contribute the funds needed, along with San Diego’s OG architecture and design filmmaker – Jeff Durkin of Breadtruck Films – we secretly arranged a day of filming to surprise some of SDAF’s finest. 

This week I’d like to share the first of those eight new films, hot off the heels of her AIA San Diego 2021 Robert Mosher Lifetime Achievement Award, we present this wonderful short film of Alison Whitelaw, FAIA. In addition to an immensely successful career and practice, over the years Alison has also been President of the AIA San Diego, AIA San Diego’s Women in Architecture, and she was the first woman President of SDAF, serving on our board in various roles for 10 years. Alison continues to contribute to our region as a founding member of the Academy of Neuroscience for Architecture.  

I am thrilled to celebrate Alison for being a trailblazing architect and her contributions to San Diego’s built environment. Thank you Alison!  

Oh, and keep checking in each month to see who we highlight next.  

Pauly 

P.S. check out this great post from AIA San Diego on Alison too!

Watch the video!

 

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Beyond the Buildings

  This is the first in an SDAF series exploring the people and companies behind San Diego’s built environment.   “It’s a unique little industry,” says Aaron Pebley, a senior project manager with KPFF Consulting Engineers. This is the understatement of the year, considering a recent feather in the KPFF …

 
This is the first in an SDAF series exploring the people and companies behind San Diego’s built environment.
 

“It’s a unique little industry,” says Aaron Pebley, a senior project manager with KPFF Consulting Engineers. This is the understatement of the year, considering a recent feather in the KPFF cap is the IQHQ RaDD (Research and Development District), the biotech “city” slated for Downtown San Diego’s waterfront. With 22 offices throughout the country—and six in California alone—KPFF creates central arteries for higher tech buildings like IQHQ’s RaDD. In San Diego, the firm is synonymous with our life science campuses, leveling up the homegrown sector. Alongside RaDD, the firm is also busy revving up adaptive reuse in Sorrento Valley. Here, we take five with Pebley…

Overarching challenge. These life science buildings need to be high-performance, and they demand so much flexibility for their lab tenants. The infrastructure that is required to support these buildings is far, far more involved than any typical office building.

Give us an example. We get an opportunity to really dive into the vibrational characteristics of the structure itself, ensuring sensitive lab equipment won’t be impacted by a vibrating floor. Imagine you are in an open office and your co-worker comes hustling down the hallway and you can feel the floor bouncing slightly as you sit in your chair. That can’t happen in a lab!

So…IQHQ Research and Development District. It really feels like a new identity is being established for downtown San Diego’s waterfront with this development, and IQHQ has the potential to serve as a lynchpin for even more life science development. Beyond the life science sector, it will also hopefully create momentum for other office and hospitality projects downtown. Downtown has been waiting for quite some time for a new market sector to plant its flag there, and with this project it appears that may finally be happening.

“Sky’s the limit in Sorrento Valley.” This corridor is really coming to life with adaptive reuse of the existing building stock there. So many existing buildings are getting significant overhauls to reuse them for life science tenants. It’s great to see some older buildings get a new life for state-of-the-art research companies.

Office perks. Many of these companies have high profile talent and clientele, and they want to go big on amenities as a way to integrate work/life. Integrating fun design elements from restaurants and breweries to fitness centers and bocce ball courts into the fabric of these beautiful buildings is always a challenge we love to solve as structural engineers!

Interview & write up by Gillian Flynn, connect with her at https://gillianvflynn.com/

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Getting Schooled: SDAF and NewSchool of Architecture & Design celebrate 10+ years of O&O

Creative partnerships can last a lifetime. That’s the drive behind the longtime collaboration with SDAF and the NewSchool of Architecture & Design. For more than 10 years, NewSchool has been the title sponsor of the annual Orchids & Onions, SDAF’s largest single fundraiser.  The innovative school, established in Downtown San …

Creative partnerships can last a lifetime.

That’s the drive behind the longtime collaboration with SDAF and the NewSchool of Architecture & Design. For more than 10 years, NewSchool has been the title sponsor of the annual Orchids & Onions, SDAF’s largest single fundraiser. 

The innovative school, established in Downtown San Diego in the late 80s, demonstrates the critical role architecture and design have in our city, and relishes bringing community into the curriculum wherever possible. Orchids & Onions, meanwhile, continues to provide a fresh, relevant platform to reintroduce the design conversation. It serves as a unifying call to action for students: come out of your silos and engage in the local context of the built environment. 

Mission accomplished. The greatest indicator of the partnership’s success is Orchids & Onions participation. This year alone, there’s SDAF Director John Martinez (Class of 2012), serving as the O&O Chair; and the jury features three NewSchool alumni, including Rachelle Domingo-Rogers (2004)  Katinka Read ( 2011) and Lucy Campbell, the current NewSchool librarian. 

“One of the interesting things about Orchids & Onions—it’s not just about design and aesthetics but making better places to live in San Diego,” says Campbell. “It’s great to see NewSchool having such an impact. We get to complete the circle.”

The partnership propels design conversations toward the future―working on building long-term solutions now while sparking action in the classroom, and the community beyond. It also provokes students to reassess and update their design strategy in response to the changing environment. 

More than anything, it’s about finding connection. Over the years, some 50-plus students and alumni have served on O&O committees and juries, according to SDAF President Pauly De Bartolo. “It’s been years of blood, sweat, tears,” says De Bartolo, “and it’s always fun collaborating with NewSchool faculty and staff as we’ve curated the O&O program, its been an amazing relationship.” 

NEW CONCENTRATIONS AT NEWSCHOOL

As San Diego continues to be a global hub and convergence point of entrepreneurs, technocrats and creative minds, NewSchool is expanding its future field of study. In 2022, the school is adding new concentrations: sustainable design and technology, urban design and development, sustainable adaptive reuse, and digital products and experiences. The school offers a range of degrees for students looking to advance their careers in architecture, construction management, graphic design and interactive media, interior architecture and design, and product design.

NEXT STOP: PORTLAND

In the 21st century, few architecture problems are straightforward. For a recent collaboration, NewSchool students extended their core knowledge into a new city, Portland. Teaming up with an S.D. architecture and engineering firm, Mackenzie, students helped reimagine and reconfigure the ODOT blocks in Portland’s Central Eastside Industrial District. It presented students an opportunity to learn about urban analysis, site selection criteria for resilient urban development, design parameters, and design methods and tools. 

The students based their proposals on real client needs and constraints within Portland’s municipal code, and received input from Rich Mitchell, contributing faculty at NewSchool and former president of Mackenzie. 

“Preparing undergraduates to enter the architecture and design industry must go beyond developing classroom learning, hyper-visual projects, and mastering the latest digital programs,” says Mitchell. “Practice-ready students must be able to convince stakeholders that their proposed vision is addressing community needs.”

Interview & write up by Gillian Flynn, connect with her at https://gillianvflynn.com/

Photo List

1. (top of post) – the 2013 O&O crew consisting of NSAD Alumni Craig Howard, Perriann Diaz (Hodges), Daniel Ordonez, Lauren Kim, Paison) & Melina Aluwi.

2. (below) – Lauren Kim (Paison), NSAD Class of 2012 heads up the backstage production of O&O 2013

3. The entry light sculpture at O&O 2013 by the NSAD student volunteer committee

4. Former NSAD faculty member Chuck Crawford & NSAD alumni Ivana Heslop (Vinksi) at O&O 2011. Chuck was the O&O Jury Liaison for 3+ years and Ivana managed the event preparation for 7+ years as well as being an SDAF Director from 2012-2013.

5. Faculty member Elana Pacenti speaks on behalf of NSAD as Title Sponsor of the O&O 2013

6. Jury Tour Napkin Sketches framed by NSAD students for the 2016 O&O Silent Auction

7. 2016 O&O, the first event to be curated in the Horton Plaza Park, Co-Chaired by NSAD alumni Perriann Diaz (Hodges) & Lauren Kim (Paison)

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Using design to elevate the San Diego lifestyle

  With an upbeat sense of community design, Michelle Harrison-McAllister creates West Coast interiors that revel in the unexpected.   “We take our relaxed environment seriously,” says Michelle Harrison-McAllister. “And there’s a new wave of residents and companies who are elevating San Diego’s lifestyle as the design centerpiece.“   The …

 

With an upbeat sense of community design, Michelle Harrison-McAllister creates West Coast interiors that revel in the unexpected.

 
“We take our relaxed environment seriously,” says Michelle Harrison-McAllister. “And there’s a new wave of residents and companies who are elevating San Diego’s lifestyle as the design centerpiece.“

 

The SDAF board member says it’s an ideal time to toast the architects and designers  who continue to shape our environment and the spaces that define it.

 

On this day, Harrison-McAllister is wearing her signature bold spectacles and a red kaftan while kicking up her heels on a neo-leather recliner.  She has mastered the art of making interiors playful yet warm, giving us a wholly modern vocabulary for comfort along the way. Founded in 2000, Michelle Harrison Design is a boutique firm specializing in lifestyle design for multi-family communities, commercial and office space.

 

The designer has spent two decades cultivating a community sensibility while keeping us guessing. The through line is her eye-catching practicality, expressiveness and proactive commitment to local collaboration.

 
“It’s all about our city and what makes it tick,” she says. “The design reinforces community by subtly reflecting it.”
 

Case in point: Casa Lago, an apartment complex next to the  Olympic Training Center in Eastlake, unites style and function.  An open floor plan creates communal spaces ideal for cooking and kicking back while two fitness rooms redefine the gym experience. A weight room is emblazoned with American murals while a cardio space is more organic thanks to greenery from Tend Living.

 
“The energy of a space can transform someone’s experience in it,” she says.

A self-described art-obsessive, Harrison-McAllister inserts local talent wherever possible. For Cielo in Little Italy, the lobby serves as a mini museo, featuring the work of San Diego artists. The overall design is modern and artful. Never stuffy.

 

A native New Englander raised in Coastal Connecticut, her designs convey a viable connection to place. Vida North Park is functionally hip. A bike storage doubles as a repair space; and the mod pool and lobby area feature an array of high-designed nooks to host everything from hipster happy hours to zoom calls.

 
Other S.D. projects show off a contemporary sensibility, and eye for unusual accents. At Broadstone Little Italy, she tapped into the barefoot lifestyle of Capri for interiors that marry European design with beachy SoCal. And at Broadstone Makers Quarter, she warmed over steely masculine design with whimsy and rock ‘n’ roll (bathrooms are plastered in speaker wallpaper).
 
Off-duty, Harrison-McAllister opts for floor-to-ceiling neutrals. Her home is awash in calming hues of cream, porcelain and muted beige. “My personality is so colorful. I love the tranquility of a blank canvas.”
 

Interview & write up by Gillian Flynn, connect with her at https://gillianvflynn.com/

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