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50/50 Orchids & Onions | Cesar Chavez Campus

Cesar Chavez Campus: 1901 Main Street, San Diego The Cesar Chavez Campus, designed by Martinez + Cutri Corporation, has been nominated for both an Orchid and an Onion in architecture. The campus is located in the heart of Barrio Logan on the corner of Main Street and Cesar Chavez Parkway and …

Cesar Chavez Campus1901 Main Street, San Diego

The Cesar Chavez Campus, designed by Martinez + Cutri Corporation, has been nominated for both an Orchid and an Onion in architecture. The campus is located in the heart of Barrio Logan on the corner of Main Street and Cesar Chavez Parkway and plays a large part in the revitalization of the area. Below, we will take a look at what the community has to say about the project so far.

 

50-50_CESAR CHAVEZ SCHOOL

Orchid

As stated above, the Cesar Chavez Campus has been nominated for an Orchid in the architecture category. The nominators really emphasizehow this campus has affected the local community in Barrio Logan. They state that the structure does a great job incorporating the designs of Latin American culture. Their nominations also say that it promotes the ideals of monumentality, materiality, and textures that are prevalent in Mayan and Aztec culture. Overall, those who have nominated the Cesar Chavez Campus for an Orchid, believe that it does a great job communicating the rich heritage of the Latin American people. Check out the Orchid nomination here.

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Onion:  

The Cesar Chavez Campus has also been nominated for an Onion in architecture. While some believe that the way the designers incorporated Mayan and Aztec designs is aesthetically appealing, some believe the way they are incorporated to be a little bit tacky. The nominators say that the different shapes and patterns of the windows look like a collage of shapes that do not work for them aesthetically. The nominators even go so far to say that the building is “turning its back on the revitalization of Barrio Logan.” Check out the Onion nomination here.

 

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We would love to hear everyone’s ideas on what they think of this building. We highly encourage you all to speak your mind in the comment section at each nomination post. Orchid or Onion? Let’s get this conversation started!

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50/50 Orchids & Onions | North Park Post Office Lofts

North Park Post Office Lofts: 3077 North Park Way, San Diego Redone by FoundationForForm Architecture & Development, the North Park Post Office Lofts have been nominated for both an Orchid and an Onion in architecture. The post office, closed in 2010, was a landmark in the area. In order to keep …

North Park Post Office Lofts3077 North Park Way, San Diego

Redone by FoundationForForm Architecture & Development, the North Park Post Office Lofts have been nominated for both an Orchid and an Onion in architecture. The post office, closed in 2010, was a landmark in the area. In order to keep the landmark, the post office was developed into the housing units we know it to be today. Below, we will take a closer look at the conversation so far on the lofts.

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Orchid

Stated above, the North Park Post Office Lofts have been nominated for an Orchid in architecture. The nominator really put a heavy emphasis on how well the new design continues the legacy of the old post office. They say this because of things like the steel exterior of the structure. The nominator has pointed out that the pattern of the steel alludes to the parcel scanner barcodes used by mail sorters. It is also worth noting that the color scheme of the design is quite subtle, allowing the original building to be highlighted. Check out the Orchid nomination here.

Onion:  

The North Park Post Office Lofts were also nominated for an Onion in architecture. The nominator feels that the overall design of the new structure does not do a very good job of fitting into the design style of the community. The nominator points out that the building is located in a 1920’s neighborhood, which makes the use of metal in all sorts of obscure angles in the design of the new structure not work with the overall design of the neighborhood. Another thing that the nominator has pointed out is that the rather large new structure provides the neighborhood with a lot of density that is not necessarily welcomed by the community. Check out the Onion nomination here.

 

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We would love to hear everyone’s ideas on what they think of this building. We highly encourage you all to speak your mind in the comment section at each nomination post. Orchid or Onion? Let’s get this conversation started!

 

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Context 3: A Day on the Bay

The San Diego Architectural Foundation held its 3rd Context event on June 2, 2016, at the end of the Broadway Pier in downtown San Diego. This Context event, titled “A Day on the Bay,” focused on visioning a smart bayfront. The event was split into two parts: Part One, which …

The San Diego Architectural Foundation held its 3rd Context event on June 2, 2016, at the end of the Broadway Pier in downtown San Diego. This Context event, titled “A Day on the Bay,” focused on visioning a smart bayfront. The event was split into two parts: Part One, which was open to the public, and Part Two, which was a ticketed event.

©Studio Maha

©Studio Maha

To start off Part One of the event, all of SDAF’s wonderful sponsors were given the opportunity to set up a booth where the public could come and inquire about their businesses. After seeing all of the organizations and businesses who took part in the event, guests were prompted to take a seat to listen to the first talk of the day. The first talk, given by Leslie Nishihira of the Unified Port of San Diego, revealed to guests the changes that are currently being made, as well as the plans for the further development of their section of the Bay. One of the changes that was highlighted by Nishihira was the upcoming Portside Pier project. This development will take up the space just south of the Maritime Museum of San Diego. The space will be divided up into 4 different pieces. Each of these pieces will be occupied by a different type of restaurant or bar. On the ocean side of the proposed project, there will be a public dock, allowing people to dock their boats and grab a nice meal.

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©Studio Maha

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©Studio Maha

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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©Studio Maha

Part Two of Day on the Bay started at 5:15pm with beverages provided by the Snake Oil Cocktail Company, and food provided by Eddie V’s, Seasons 52, Coasterra, Asaggio, and Jerry G. Bishop’s Greek Islands Cafe. At 7pm, the panel talk, moderated by Jennifer Luce, and given by Chula Vista City Manager Gary Halbert, City of San Diego’s Deputy Chief Operating Officer David Graham, Port Environmental Advisory Committee member Robert Nelson, and Unified Port of San Diego leader Jason Giffen, began. Jason Giffen spoke about the relatively new approach that the group is using in planning the future of the ports of San Diego. The group calls it “integrated planning.” Integrated planning is a holistic based approach to planning. Essentially, instead of thinking of the different ports as individual plans, the Unified Port of San Diego thinks of all the plans together as a network of plans. Because of this, when considering new proposals for the ports, it is crucial to think about how one plan works with the other plans. To start the planning process, they begin with a large scale master plan, where they hammer out all of their ideas, and figure out just exactly what they want to see in the future in the ports. Then the group looks to each one of the ports individually, and figures out how they can integrate this master plan into each redevelopment. This idea of integrated planning helps keep one consistent theme in the development of the ports, and allows San Diego as a whole to get the very most out of its ports.

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©Studio Maha

The point of this Context event was to let the public experience the future of the San Diego Bay. The people of San Diego play an integral role in the future of the redevelopment of each space. Through A Day on the Bay, the Unified Port of San Diego was not only able to obtain a general idea of what the San Diego community thinks of each plan, but they were also able to get some feedback from other San Diego residents. Events like this one allow for the public to really make the bay their own. This is certainly a very exciting time for San Diego as a whole as the upcoming plans for the bay feature some outstanding eateries, and certainly some future San Diego landmarks.

 

See more pictures from this wonderful event HERE!

 

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PechaKucha: Re-Imagine Normal Street

As a part of the Hillcrest Business Association’s endeavor to re-imagine Normal Street, a PechaKucha Night was held on May 12th, 2016. The event itself was held on the street, just outside of the Hillcrest Brewing Company. Guests were able to either sit inside of the bar and restaurant while …

Community Mural

The Pride Flag Monument

As a part of the Hillcrest Business Association’s endeavor to re-imagine Normal Street, a PechaKucha Night was held on May 12th, 2016. The event itself was held on the street, just outside of the Hillcrest Brewing Company. Guests were able to either sit inside of the bar and restaurant while listening to the main event, or they could sit outside in the seating provided around the stage. Other than the speakers, the event provided a range of different activities for guests to participate in. These activities ranged from helping paint a “paint by numbers” community mural, to grabbing a bite to eat at one of the several food trucks there.

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The event was quite successful in its ability to let the public know just what the Hillcrest Business Association wants to do with Normal Street. This plan was highlighted in the talk given by Michael Brennan. Michael Brennan, a landscape architect, first got involved with changing Normal Street when he came up with the idea of installing a large scale pride flag on Normal Street. After seeing how the Hillcrest community has embraced this monument, he knew that more had to be done to the area in order to make it a better community space. Brennan’s plan, as of now, is to shut down a portion of the southbound side of Normal Street, just outside of the Hillcrest Brewing Company, and make the current northbound side into a two-way street. With the portion of Normal Street that will be shut down, Brennan wants to establish a beautiful greenway for the community to use. The idea behind this greenway community space is to express the ideals set forth in the colors of the pride flag. The plan that Brennan has come up with is absolutely stunning, and will encourage members of the community to spend their free time on Normal Street.

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Dwell Home Tours 2016 – San Diego

Dwell, a company that loves to highlight unique and beautiful residences, has decided that it is time to bring back one of their most exciting events, the Dwell Home Tours! These home tours allow viewers a unique perspective on a handful of the most beautifully designed homes in an area. …

Dwell, a company that loves to highlight unique and beautiful residences, has decided that it is time to bring back one of their most exciting events, the Dwell Home Tours! These home tours allow viewers a unique perspective on a handful of the most beautifully designed homes in an area. The viewer gets the opportunity to notice the incredible amount of detail and expert planning that went into each and every home. Each series of home tours that Dwell puts on consists of two events: Meet the Architects night, an hour and a half long event where everybody gets a chance to listen to the architects of each of the homes on the tour while they enjoy cocktails and some light food, and the actual home tours occurring the next day.

San Diego was lucky enough to be chosen as the first of seven stops on the 2016 Dwell Home Tour circuit. The Meet the Architects night on this stop was held at Sparks Gallery, in downtown San Diego, on Friday, April 15th from 7:00 to 8:30pm. The event allowed for participants to meet and listen to a preview of each house given by the architects. The featured firms consisted of Architects Magnus, Steven Lombardi, and Nakhshab Development and Design. Those who attended this night of dynamic conversation and great fun certainly were only made even more excited for the tours the following day by this opportunity to gain some inside information on the design process.

 

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The next day, Saturday, April 16th, the home tours took place from 10:00am to 4pm. Two of the homes that were shown on this truly riveting tour were Dolphin Place, and the Lahaye Residence. Dolphin Place, designed by Hector and Pamela Magnus of Architects Magnus, is a renovation of a fisherman’s cottage. The Magnus’ worked their magic by opening up the cottage style home to provide the residents with a light and airy feeling. This airiness not only provides a more fluid transition for people traveling through the residence, but also allows for the home to be an excellent entertainment space. To improve further on the entertainment possibilities for the home, Architects Magnus also converted the garage into a modern and sleek lounge area. On top of the converted garage, the architects also made a simply gorgeous rooftop deck. Another home featured on the Dwell Home Tours was the Lahaye Residence. Soheil Nakhshab, of Nakhshab Development and Design, put a heavy emphasis on materiality in the design of the home. He was able to incorporate stone, wood, and iron in his perfectly seamless design. These materials heavily accentuate the geometric form of the home, and provide it with that sleek, modern style.

 

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©Architects Magnus

 

The Dwell Home Tours certainly provided some great insights as to what amazing things have been done with housing in San Diego. We hope for similar success in future Dwell Home Tours, as well as the continued development of such innovative designs in San Diego.

 

For more information on architectural events in San Diego, give SDAF a follow on social media:

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PechaKucha April 7, 2016

PechaKucha Night, an event held in 900 cities worldwide, returned to San Diego, California on April 7th, 2016. The event gathered designers, architects and artists at the Bread & Salt Workshop to share their life stories as well as their current and most prestigious projects. For the 23rd time, the …

©Maha

PechaKucha Night, an event held in 900 cities worldwide, returned to San Diego, California on April 7th, 2016. The event gathered designers, architects and artists at the Bread & Salt Workshop to share their life stories as well as their current and most prestigious projects. For the 23rd time, the San Diego Architectural Foundation put on the event, which unsurprisingly turned out to be yet another great success thanks to wonderful location, the Bread and Salt Workshop, and some truly outstanding speakers. The evening began with a cocktail hour at 7:30 pm, which allowed people to wander in, grab a drink and some food, and take in the studio space. Around 8:20, guests filed into the largest room of the building, vying for a good spot to watch the presentations. The event had a total of 7 speakers, who each had twenty slides, with twenty seconds per slide. What made the presentations breathtaking was the way the slides would not wait for anybody. Once the twenty seconds were up, the slides would move on regardless whether or not the speaker had finished commenting on it.
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The presentations of Dominique Houriet, and Jeff Svitak are two good examples of the range of topics that the speakers presented. The focus in Dominique Houriet’s presentation was what he believes it takes to be an effective architect. According to Houriet, each project has three steps: the design, the permitting, and the construction. Houriet spoke of the importance of being on site, as an architect, during construction. Being on site includes the architect into the construction team and ensures greatly that his or her true goals for the building are reached. Another important point that Houriet made was that it is important to have something that you can do with your own hands. For him, this act is designing and building his own chairs. He says that it relaxes him, since there is no permitting or red tape, just him and the shop he is in.

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While Houriet talked of what he believes it takes to be an effective architect, Jeff Svitak spoke about his journey to becoming a successful architect. Svitak had his first architectural experience in San Diego during his collegiate years when he had an internship down on State Street. After graduating from his university, he moved back to San Diego, where he made construction drawings for a few years. He eventually broke onto the architectural scene when he began working under Sebastian Mariscal. Mariscal molded Svitak for 8 years, until Svitak decided that he was finally ready to open his own office. Since then he has designed and developed numerous buildings throughout San Diego. Currently Svitak is working on a new building in Little Italy, a project in North Park, as well as a custom home, also in North Park.

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Want to see more pictures of the event? Click HERE

 

For more information on architectural events in San Diego, give SDAF a follow on social media:

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Introducing new SDAF leaders!

Wow, what an amazing start it has been to 2015 for SDAF! As promised, this year is going to be super exciting as we work towards several new initiatives to increase our outreach and ultimately broaden both awareness and education about San Diego’s built environment. Firstly we are excited to …

Wow, what an amazing start it has been to 2015 for SDAF! As promised, this year is going to be super exciting as we work towards several new initiatives to increase our outreach and ultimately broaden both awareness and education about San Diego’s built environment.

Firstly we are excited to announce that we have a new President, Pauly De Bartolo!

Pauly De Bartolo, Associate AIA

A Partner at De Bartolo + Rimanic Design Studio, Pauly has been volunteering for SDAF since the 2011 Orchids & Onions program. He was invited to the SDAF Board of Directors in 2012 and subsequently elected to the VP role through 2013 and 2014. Having participated in most of SDAF’s programs through Co-Chairing O&O not once, but  twice, coordinating several Pecha Kucha Night events (and presenting one), volunteering at the Orchids, Onions & Opportunities exhibit and much more, Pauly is passionate about contributing to the continual improvement of San Diego’s built environment through SDAF programming. In addition to SDAF, Pauly volunteers on the Gaslamp Quarter’s Land Use & Planning Committee & has Co-Chaired the La Jolla Historical Society’s ‘Young Architects Summer Camp’ for middle & high school students for the past 2 years. Pauly was born in Sydney, Australia and relocated to San Diego in 2005 where he plans to call home for a long time to come.

In addition to Pauly, we are proud to introduce two new members to the 2015 SDAF Board of Directors:

Matthew Geaman, AIA

In addition to being an Associate Principal at Joseph Wong Design Associates, Matthew has been actively involved in San Diego’s architectural community, most recently as the 2014 President of AIA San Diego.

David McCullough, ASLA

Beyond his daily endeavors as Principal at McCullough Landscape Architecture, David is reconnecting with SDAF (after serving two previous terms as a Director) in addition to being the founding coordinator of Pecha Kucha Night, San Diego chapter.

The entire list of committed doers and thinkers that serve as directors of SDAF can be found here.

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Onion update | How to redesign those extra large signs

How could anyone forget the City of San Diego’s 2014 People’s Choice Onion for the over-sized parking signs. They are hard to miss… Think that’s bad, check out this 15′ tall “totem” sign pole from Los Angeles with parking regulation stacked on top of parking regulation. Crazy right?! See more …

How could anyone forget the City of San Diego’s 2014 People’s Choice Onion for the over-sized parking signs. They are hard to miss… Think that’s bad, check out this 15′ tall “totem” sign pole from Los Angeles with parking regulation stacked on top of parking regulation. Crazy right?! See more here.

onion signculvercityparkingsign

Well, it seems that Los Angeles has taken on the design challenge that these signs with numerous parking regulations present. As reported in Citylab by The Atlantic, they have unveiled new “easy to read” parking signs, that surprisingly are actually quite easy to read with their “grid-style” graphic with simple color coding and graphic representations instead of words. Nice work LA!

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San Diego’s very own bright design minds reached out to SDAF to take on the challenge of our Onion-winning signs. John Ball, Creative Director of MiresBall sent us this email:

Onion, or opportunity?

At the recent San Diego Architectural Foundation’s Orchids and Onions, a People’s
Choice Onion was “awarded” to the City of San Diego for its Oversize Vehicle
Ordinance Signs.

Unintentionally ironic, the extra-large 30″ by 36″ signs are meant to prohibit extra-large
vehicles from parking on city streets. And not only are they too big, they’re just plain
ugly—adding to the visual pollution of the street even as they attempt to limit it.
 
But does it have to be this way? City signs have to be legible, yes, but do they need to
be eyesores? And can the application of some of our favorite design principles create a
smaller, cleaner sign that is arguably MORE readable?
 
Happily, the answer is yes. Check out our design redo.

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John Ball
Partner/Creative Director
MiresBall
 
P.S. City of San Diego, you can reach us at 619-234-6631.

Much improved. Thank you John. Take note City of San Diego. Good design can transform the status quo and be infinitely more practical too…

Shall we launch a guerrilla campaign to replace them? Who’s in?

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