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New Member Spotlight: Designing Women

Behind every great friendship is a great story. For Ann Golumbuk and Rachel Moriarty, the story begins with color. “If there’s color, I’m all over it,” says Golumbuk, a San Diego-based abstract artist. Moriarty, the proprietor of Rachel Moriarty Interiors, is the same way. “Rachel and I have a connection,” …

Photo by Deborah Shields Photography

Behind every great friendship is a great story. For Ann Golumbuk and Rachel Moriarty, the story begins with color.

“If there’s color, I’m all over it,” says Golumbuk, a San Diego-based abstract artist. Moriarty, the proprietor of Rachel Moriarty Interiors, is the same way.

“Rachel and I have a connection,” Golumbuk says. “We’re both high energy. She’s a go-getter, and I could tell the minute I met her — she knows color.”

We met the two ladies at the SDAF Member Lunch in February. Held at Broadstone Makers Quarter, the lunch brought together members from all over the city. Like so many others, Golumbuk and Moriarty joined SDAF looking to immerse themselves in a community of creative individuals. What they found was a sense of belonging.

Now they’re featured in a San Diego Home Garden Lifestyle Magazine spread, one that highlights Moriarty’s interior design and Golumbuk’s art.

Ann Golumbuk typically paints in a statement-making orange suit. Photo by Deborah Shields Photography.

Using Design to Tell a Story

 

“With residential interiors, it’s about telling the client’s story in their own space,” says Moriarty, who once owned a furniture store in La Jolla. “I’ve always been one to incorporate found pieces, and when someone hires me, I become their visual storyteller.”

As an artist, Golumbuk likes to incorporate found objects too. Metal, wood, stone, shredded canvas. If it’s raw or recycled material, it’s fair game. All of it gives her abstracts an urban appeal for the clients who buy art right off her walls.

“I’m an alley person,” she says. “I go down alleys and see what I can find. Learning which materials people are using spurs my creativity.”

In one stroll down the alley, she collected three metal pieces with blue paint on them. Today, they stand as a sculpture in her yard.

Rachel Moriarty stands in a space she designed in Ann’s living room. Photo by Deborah Shields Photography.

Moriarty shares that gift for repurposing, incorporating clients’ global artifacts and mementos into the design. A Japanese textile here, a Korean chest there. When she and Golumbuk put their minds together, the collaboration manifested quite literally in a work of art.

As Moriarty pondered how to incorporate her friend’s dining room table into the design, Golumbuk came up with the idea to paint a piece. They had a section of wood cut, Golumbuk worked on an abstract, and the table is now the centerpiece of the home.

“I wanted my paintings to come out into the room,” Golumbuk says. “When you’re sitting in my house, you’re part of the painting.”

Feeling at Home at SDAF

 

That kind of ingenuity energizes the two women, and it’s reflective of the out-of-the-box thinking that attracted them to SDAF. Moriarty had been looking for the right fit for a while, something that celebrated her passions. When she discovered the architectural foundation through SDAF board member and designer Michelle Harrison-McAllister, everything clicked.

Ann and Rachel with ladies at the SDAF Member Lunch.  Their friend Michelle Harrison-McAllister stands one in from the left.

“When I went to the member lunch at Broadstone Makers Quarter, I thought, ‘This is something I can see myself being part of,’” says Moriarty, who grew up watching her dad construct architectural models as a pastime. “I felt so alive. For so long, I had dipped my toe in to test the water. SDAF was a full-bodied yes for me.”

An instructor at Art on 30th, Golumbuk was drawn to SDAF by a desire to broaden her network, stay up on San Diego development, and connect with creative individuals. She had risen from the ashes after being hit by a drunk driver in 2009, an event that changed the course of her life and career.

For more than a year, the one-time fitness trainer lay on the floor of her newly built home, recovering. Studying the room’s bare walls, the same thought occurred to her day after day. “I have to paint some art.”

On that floor, in those moments, a rebirth was in the works. When a friend said she was taking an art class, Golumbuk picked herself up off the floor. She hasn’t stopped painting since.

Moriarty and Golumbuk go at life with all they have. Nowhere is that more apparent than in their work. “We just want to live this life,” Golumbuk says. “Live out loud.”

Do you like to live out loud, too? Become an SDAF member today and feel part of something special.

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Behind OH! San Diego’s Success, A Volunteer Corps and Strong Sense of Community

OH! San Diego 2020 may be over, but the positive energy from the weekend still lingers. As hundreds of people turned out for the fifth annual celebration of urban design, architecture and the built environment, they were treated to a free, weekend-long event that truly inspired. Hosted by the San …

OH! San Diego 2020 may be over, but the positive energy from the weekend still lingers. As hundreds of people turned out for the fifth annual celebration of urban design, architecture and the built environment, they were treated to a free, weekend-long event that truly inspired.

Hosted by the San Diego Architectural Foundation from March 6-8, OH! San Diego (short for Open House) took place in nine local neighborhoods, from Balboa Park and Bankers Hill to Barrio Logan and Coronado. At every turn, the citywide Open House shined a light on the impact that impeccable design and innovative vision can have on community.

To learn about Open House’s deeper impact, we turned to those who know it best — the longtime volunteers who have watched the annual showcase grow up. Here’s why OH! San Diego enhances the San Diego cultural experience so much, in their words.

Dominique Valentino

“It’s a fun way to learn about neighborhoods in San Diego, even neighborhoods you thought you knew so much about,” says Dominique Valentino, who first learned of Open House four years ago, in a UCSD Extension class with Dr. Diane Kane.

Encouraged by Kane to volunteer for the event, Valentino donated her time at Villa Montezuma and the Marston House. She’s been part of Open House every year since, in roles ranging from site coordinator to committee member.

“OH! San Diego presents a great opportunity to familiarize yourself with neighborhoods you’ve never really explored,” says Valentino, who this year helped coordinate volunteers in Balboa Park and pitched in at the Hotel del Coronado. “We have such diverse architecture in San Diego, coupled with a rich history. Put all of that together with the people behind it, and OH! San Diego feels like time well spent.”

In 2020, Paul Engel was back for Open House for a third year.

“It’s great, I love it,” he said from his post outside the Timken Museum, where he was promoting the program, displaying T-shirts and greeting visitors. “OH presents an opportunity to learn about the buildings that you walk by every day and usually can’t get inside. But on Open House weekend, guess what? You can access them — for free. My love of architecture, history and lighting design drew me to OH, and the event itself instills and encourages passion in those who participate.”

Paul Engel volunteering in Balboa Park

Like so many others who feel drawn to the wide-ranging celebration of the built environment, Engel and Valentino return to it year after year because of the special community it attracts.

Rosamaria Acuña, a Realtor with Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, feels the strong sense of community, too. An OH! committee member and sponsor who became involved with the showcase two years ago, Acuña felt pulled to OH! San Diego by a desire to give back to the city that has enriched her with so much.

“Open House brings people and communities together,” Acuña says. “It provides a framework through which people can learn and explore San Diego’s rich history. Through architecture and design, we can learn about the city’s past and present and look to the future.”

Rosamaria Acuña (far right) with Carol Chin and other OH San Diego committee members

Acuña stays involved with the program because she enjoys the positivity of event organizers Carol Chin and Maxine Ward, two women she now calls friends. She also admires the vision that event founder Susanne Friestedt showed in bringing the international event to San Diego five years ago.

With more than 300 volunteers contributing to OH! San Diego’s success this year, “this worldwide event is a gift to San Diego,” Acuña says. “Let’s treasure it and promote it to ensure it remains here for a long time to come.”

This year’s event may be over, but we need help for next year. Are you interested in becoming part of the OH! San Diego volunteer family? Email SDAF Operations Manager Beth Geraci at info@sdarchitecture.org to get involved.

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OH! San Diego Opens the Door to Beautiful Design

As a child, Nikki Kreibich liked to drive around and look at architecture with her dad. As an adult, she still makes the drives. “I’ve been taking them my whole life,” Kreibich says. The drives are rooted in her passion for architecture. After all, Kreibich’s not-so-distant ancestor was a San …

As a child, Nikki Kreibich liked to drive around and look at architecture with her dad. As an adult, she still makes the drives.

“I’ve been taking them my whole life,” Kreibich says.

The drives are rooted in her passion for architecture. After all, Kreibich’s not-so-distant ancestor was a San Diego founding father, and she has family roots in the Normal School designed by famed architect Irving Gill.

Volunteering for OH! San Diego for the past three years has allowed Kreibich, an expert in historic and architecturally significant properties, to breathe new life into her architectural passion.

OH! San Diego, short for Open House, strives to put San Diego on the map of cities renowned for their architecture and design. In the five years of its existence, the showcase has shown that it’s serious about that goal.

This year’s event, featuring 93 participating sites, takes place this weekend (March 6-8) in nine San Diego neighborhoods, from Point Loma and La Jolla to the Gaslamp and Coronado.

“I love it, because it opens buildings to the public that they wouldn’t have a chance to see otherwise,” says Kreibich, a real estate agent at Whissel Realty Group. “Working with the public, seeing their joy and excitement, you can sense that Open House exposes them to something new. As they come from all over to explore these buildings, their excitement is palpable.”

That’s because OH! San Diego shows visitors and residents a new side of the city, one that drives their appreciation for beauty and creative vision. “People don’t realize that a neighborhood like Bankers Hill has these jewels,” says Kreibich, who has volunteered there as part of OH! for three years.

“Definitely my passion is Bankers Hill,” she says. “Other neighborhoods are more geared toward tourists. But visitors aren’t necessarily aware of the history of the buildings in Bankers Hill, so I get to see how OH! weekend really educates and inspires people about architecture.”

OH’s penchant for educating and inspiring is one of its calling cards. Want to see how flawless design influences you? Get out this weekend and see what OH! San Diego has in store. You won’t regret it.

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Beginner’s Guide to OH! San Diego 2020

With 93 participating sites in nine neighborhoods and three days to see it all,  planning for OH! San Diego 2020 can seem daunting. But it doesn’t have to be. Whether you’re brand new to Open House or a seasoned pro, our guide to the city’s largest architectural showcase breaks it …

With 93 participating sites in nine neighborhoods and three days to see it all,  planning for OH! San Diego 2020 can seem daunting. But it doesn’t have to be. Whether you’re brand new to Open House or a seasoned pro, our guide to the city’s largest architectural showcase breaks it down for you with four top tips. So you can focus on the important thing —having fun.

Keep It Simple.  It’s true that OH! San Diego has a lot in store. But you don’t have to see it all. With about 10 featured sites in each neighborhood, we recommend exploring one neighborhood per day and taking it at your own pace. By choosing OH! neighborhoods that border each other, such as Bankers Hill and downtown, you’ll leave yourself room to explore more if time allows.

Plan Ahead.  Each participating site is described and pictured on the OH! San Diego website. Planning your route before you go will make the event more manageable and more fun. Check out our digital map and guide to start planning now. Printed maps and guides will be available during OH! San Diego at neighborhood hubs, while supplies last. Whether you prefer experimental arts spaces like Site 58| Bread & Salt in Barrio Logan or cultured masterpieces like Site 74 | the Grande Colonial Hotel, knowing which sites you’d like to see before OH! weekend arrives will give you something to look forward to.

Use the Archimaps App. Available for Android or iOS,  Archimaps makes navigating OH! weekend easy. The app has two navigation modes: map and list. Map allows you to search sites by location and relate them to your own position. List shows buildings sorted by proximity, date or alphabetically. The route planner helps you find your way to the selected building. A favorites tool is also available, allowing you to save a selection of preferred sites.

Take a tour. Whether you prefer self-guided or guided tours, this is a unique way to see some of the best of the city’s design. Take a guided tour of the San Diego Convention Center, explore Petco Park or take a stroll your own way on a great selection of self-guided tours listed in the OH! guide. Coronado especially offers some unique self-guided tours, including at the Coronado Historical Association Museum, the Hotel del Coronado and the John D. Spreckels Center & Bowling Green. And that’s just the start.

For the full scoop on everything OH! related, check out sdarchitecture.org. Want to get involved in the program yourself? We still need volunteers! Email Carol Chin to see how you can help.

Featured photo by Oliver Asis

 

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OH! San Diego 2019 Photo Competition Winners Announced!

We received close to 150 entries in our Open House San Diego (OH! San Diego) photo competition. Thank you for your submissions! We hope you enjoyed OH! San Diego and the opportunity it provides every year to take some unique shots. Check out the gallery. Our judges selected first and …

We received close to 150 entries in our Open House San Diego (OH! San Diego) photo competition. Thank you for your submissions! We hope you enjoyed OH! San Diego and the opportunity it provides every year to take some unique shots. Check out the gallery.

Our judges selected first and second place winners in three categories, Interior, Exterior and Detail. Congratulations to the winners! We look forward to next year’s event and some more fabulous photos of our great places and spaces! Drop a line to info@sdarchitecture.org if you have any feedback on the photo competition.

Interior Category

First Place: Michael Booth

Lyle & Grace Prescott Memorial Prayer Chapel | Site 74

 

Second Place: Mike Hume

The Historic Spreckels Theatre | Site 39

 

Exterior Category

First Place: Ashley Fernando

The Salk Institute | Site 100

 

Second Place: David Weine

Urban Discovery Academy | Site 47

 

Detail Category

First Place: Elizabeth Rufener

The US Grant Hotel | Site 34

 

Second Place: Bradley Shapiro

Sim Bruce & Janet Richards Residence III | Site 79

Thanks to:

Photo competition organizer and judge: David Harrison of Harrison Photographic
Prize sponsor and judge: Gerald Shonkwiler Photography
Photo competion judge: Elisa Thomson of Outside the Lens
Prize sponsor: Nelson Photo, Warwick’s Books

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Gordon Carrier’s lecture on SDSU West Master Plan

Carrier, Chairman and Design Principal of Carrier Johnson + CULTURE, will discuss the conceptual site planning design he led for San Diego State University. Campus supporters successfully mounted an initiative campaign to direct the city to sell the property where SDCCU Stadium was opened in 1967. The SDSU effort won …

Carrier, Chairman and Design Principal of Carrier Johnson + CULTURE, will discuss the conceptual site planning design he led for San Diego State University. Campus supporters successfully mounted an initiative campaign to direct the city to sell the property where SDCCU Stadium was opened in 1967. The SDSU effort won city voter approval over the competing SoccerCity plan on the November ballot.

It is unclear at the moment how much of the SDSU West plan will be adopted by California State University if both sides come to terms on the transfer of the property. Months of planning and environmental review will be necessary before the roadmap is adopted.

But it’s safe to assume that the major components will show up in the plan: a new, smaller stadium for Aztec football and other sports; thousands of housing units; space for commercial office buildings and university uses; retail and hotel buildings; and a San Diego River park.

Watch Gordon Carrier’s lecture on SDSU West Master Plan:

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OH! San Diego 2018 Photo Competition Winners Announced!

We again received over 200 entries in our Open House San Diego (OH! San Diego) photo competition. Thank you for your submissions! We hope you are enjoying OH! San Diego and the opportunities it provides to take some unique shots. Check out the gallery. Our judges selected first and second …

We again received over 200 entries in our Open House San Diego (OH! San Diego) photo competition. Thank you for your submissions! We hope you are enjoying OH! San Diego and the opportunities it provides to take some unique shots. Check out the gallery.

Our judges selected first and second place winners in three categories, Interior, Exterior and Detail. Congratulations to the winners! We look forward to next year’s event and some more fabulous photos of our great places and spaces! Drop a line to info@sdarchitecture.org if you have any feedback on the photo competition.

Interior Category

First Place: Oliver Asis Photography (image below of All Souls Episcopal Church | Site 65)

 

Second Place: Kathleen Alviz (image below of DGA Architecture & Planning | Site 13)

 

Exterior Category

First Place: Wilda Wong (image below of US Courthouse on the Judicial Center Walking Tour | Site 29)

 

Second Place: Oliver Asis Photography (image below of Latter & Sator Hall at PLNU | Site 70)

 

Detail Category

First Place: John Muller (image below of North Chapel at Liberty Station | Site 77)

 

Second Place:  Paul Shilling (image below of San Diego Central Library | Site 52)

 

Thanks to:

Photo competition organizer and judge: David Harrison of Harrison Photographic
Prize sponsor and judge: Gerald Shonkwiler Photography
Prize sponsor: Nelson Photo, Warwick’s Books

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Open House San Diego Photo Competition Winners Announced!

We were delighted to receive over 200 entries to our inaugural Open House San Diego photo competition. They really give you a feel for the day and how people explored the sites on offer. Check out the gallery. Our panel of judges selected first and second place winners in three …

We were delighted to receive over 200 entries to our inaugural Open House San Diego photo competition. They really give you a feel for the day and how people explored the sites on offer. Check out the gallery.

Our panel of judges selected first and second place winners in three categories, Interior, Exterior and Detail. Congratulations to the winners! We look forward to next year’s event and some more fabulous photos of our great places and spaces! Drop a line to info@sdarchitecture.org if you have any feedback on the photo competition.

Interior Category

First Place: Charmaine Gray Photography (image below)

Second Place: Lina Mastrangelo (image below)

Exterior Category

First Place: Kristina Nugent (image below)

Second Place: Ernesto Becerra (image below)

Detail Category

First Place: Lucie Samarkova (image below)

Second Place:  Ernesto Becerra (image below)

Thanks to:

Photo competition organizer: David Harrison of Harrison Photographic
Prize sponsor and judge: Gerald Shonkwiler Photography
Prize sponsor: Warwick’s Books
Judges: Ron Miriello and Lloyd Russell, AIA

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Open House San Diego Tours of Chicano Park

During Open House San Diego, March 25 & 26, there are four opportunities to tour the historic landmark,  Chicano Park with its collection of vibrant murals painted on the pillars, abutments and ramps of the Coronado Bay Bridge in Barrio Logan. We are fortunate to have these tours be led …

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During Open House San Diego, March 25 & 26, there are four opportunities to tour the historic landmark,  Chicano Park with its collection of vibrant murals painted on the pillars, abutments and ramps of the Coronado Bay Bridge in Barrio Logan. We are fortunate to have these tours be led by one of the mural artists, Mario Torero. We sat down with Mario to talk about what he sees for the future of Barrio Logan, as well as to get a taste of what tour attendees will experience.

Mario, born in Peru, came to Barrio Logan at the age of twelve, right about the time when the Barrio was just beginning to establish itself. In 1970, the people of Barrio Logan reclaimed land intended for a California Highway Patrol substation and created Chicano Park, a testament to the strength and beauty of their culture. Many people from the community helped make the park what it is today, including Mario and his father. Mario has been extremely involved in the development of the arts in not only the Barrio Logan area, but also East Village and Downtown San Diego.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERASince Mario first settled in San Diego, he has seen the impact that Barrio Logan has had on the city of San Diego, helping make it the outstanding cultural hub that it is today. Mario states that as things change throughout the city of San Diego, it is crucial to remember that San Diego is most importantly a “cultural city.” This is something that Mario, as well as many other artists and community members in Barrio Logan, fear is going to disappear as the city continues to move into a new age. In order to combat this, Mario and many others are trying to raise awareness of the change that is happening, not so that they can prevent the change, but rather so they can ensure that the culture that has been established by the people of Barrio Logan is embraced and is incorporated into this new age of the city of San Diego. Learn more about Mario from his website, fuerzamundo.org, and connect with him on Facebook at facebook.com/mariotoreroartivist/.

This topic of cultural importance leads us into what exactly you will be able to expect on one of Mario’s four tours during Open House San Diego. He will walk the groups throughout Chicano Park, which he calls “the protector of Barrio Logan.” Mario will stop at each mural along the way and tell you not just about the surface of each mural, but also the historical and cultural meaning behind each one. This history is very important to understanding just what Barrio Logan, and Chicano Park mean to the city of San Diego. Mario hopes that through these tours, he will help people be able to see the culture that he lives and breathes, and realize that it is something that needs to be a part of the future of the city.

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Artist Mario Torero

 

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San Diego Architectural Foundation

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Email
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